Friday, July 27, 2012

Yellow Transparents

It was the call I was waiting for.  Several blocks from our house stands a lovely, old, farm-style house.  In the yard an ancient Yellow Transparent Apple tree spreads it twisted branches.  I cruise local neighborhoods looking for that kind of tree.  "May I buy some of your apples?" is the line I use.  Most folks go from blank to grateful at the prospect of unloading worthless apples that become wasp attractors within a few days of falling off the tree.  The apples announce their ripeness by dropping to the ground.  Brooke was phoning to say the apples were ripe.  Come get them off the ground.  Today.  Please!
Enough Yellow Transparents to make more than a gallon of sauce





I've loved these apples all my life, not for eating from the tree, but for the delicious sauce they make, thick, tart and smooth as velvet.  My grandmother had an old tree that yielded dozens of quarts of sauce every summer.  They are ready to cook up right after the raspberries are finished.

Victorio Strainer:  a sauce makers dream
Cooked fruit goes in the top
Peelings come out the spout on the left
Sauce pours into the dish









A brief search told me that the tree is from very old Russian stalk, is exceptionally cold hardy, and tends to take every other year off to rest.  Someone's blog said they were worthless and in their area were called "throwing apples" since those folks believed the only thing they were good for was throwing at dogs and cats (that tells you more than you want to know about the whole mentality of the area).



Finished sauce, hot and ready for sugar














In our family, these apples are gold.  We love this sauce more than any other fruit sauce, so after gathering the apples at Brooke's, the next of the Things I get to do today is assemble my Victorio Strainer and make The Best apple sauce in the world.

8 comments:

  1. We canned so much apple sauce when the kids were little. Glad to know it's still an are in practice.

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    1. And we pass this love of sauce on to our children. It will never die!

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  2. Alright recipe? What do you add to the apples? Thanks we have some coming off now too...

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    1. These need sugar/honey or something to sweeten them. Other than that they are fabulous all my themselves.

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks, Dolly Darlin'. See you around.

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  4. The sauce looks so velvety. I miss good apples. Those apples look like the kind I sued to sit in the apple tree and eat. Mom was always asking where the box of salt went :-)
    Here in the south, they grow some apples, but they do not taste like the apples I grew up on in Ohio.

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    1. Oh, Oh, Oh! What memories you just unleashed. I think we salted those sour green things, too!

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